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High levels of exports continue in April - Stats NZ

Contributor:
Fuseworks Media
Fuseworks Media

Goods exports in April have remained at high levels, just below the record levels seen in March this year, Stats NZ said today.

In April 2019, the value of total goods exports rose $581 million (12 percent) from April 2018 to reach $5.5 billion. This month’s increase was driven by dairy products, logs, and kiwifruit.

Dairy products (our largest export commodity group) led the rise in exports, up $124 million to $1.3 billion in April 2019.

"As we approach the end of the dairy season, we are still seeing high values and quantities of dairy products being exported," international statistics manager Tehseen Islam said.

"Often the movement in total dairy exports is dominated by our main markets, particularly China."

Milk powder was the main contributor to the overall rise in dairy, up $137 million in value on a year earlier. This rise contrasts with milk fats (including butter), down $60 million.

Other key contributors to the rise in exports were untreated logs (up $71 million), kiwifruit (up $67 million), and meat and edible offal (up $51 million).

Imports up despite fall in cars

In April 2019, the value of total goods imports rose to $5.1 billion, up $348 million (7.3 percent) from April 2018. This rise was mainly due to a large increase in aircraft and parts (up $138 million). Imports of aircraft and parts are irregular and can mean large rises or falls in monthly values.

This rise was offset by a fall in motor vehicles, down $184 million. This decrease was from an unusually high level in April 2018 when two additional vehicle carriers were unloaded, after earlier shipment delays due to the discovery of stink bugs on ships in February 2018. (see Overseas merchandise trade: April 2018)

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