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Popular 80s character Terry Teo makes a comeback

Fuseworks Media
Fuseworks Media

Young people are the big winners from the latest NZ On Air television funding decisions. They’ll be treated to two local drama series in 2014 including the return of popular character, Terry Teo .

Terry Teo, a six-part drama for TV2, reprises the tale of a savvy teenager surviving the mean streets of Auckland which first emerged as a comic in 1982, then a much-loved live-action series in 1985.

There’ll also be another series of the acclaimed Girl vs Boy, which was this year promoted into prime-time by TV2.

"It is significant to have two quality locally-made drama series for young people - a real sign that programme-makers, broadcasters and NZ On Air value this audience," said NZ On Air CEO Jane Wrightson.

Pre-schoolers will also have a mix of new and popular returning local programmes to look forward to next year. A new animated series, a spin-off from the popular Tiki Tour, called Little Monstar has been supported. Made for TV2 the five minute segments will be based on a creative slice of everyday life.

Two series launched in 2013 have proven so successful that a second series of each will proceed. The animated Wiki The Kiwi delighted audiences on TV2, as did popular puppet-based series The Moe Show on Four.

NZ On Air has also continued to back several long-running popular shows including Operation Hero, Just the Job, What Now and Sticky TV and a new after-school programme, to replace The Erin Simpson Show, with the working title Afternoons on 2.

In total in this round NZ On Air has committed just over $14.7 million in funding for quality locally made children’s TV in 2014.

"Children’s programming is a high priority for NZ On Air. We spend on average 23 per cent of our budget on locally made content for children," said Ms Wrightson. "The majority of this content would not be made at all without NZ On Air support. We provide the financial backing for 76 per cent of first-run locally-made children’s programming."

"We continue to look for ways to support more new content for children, within the funding constraints. We are particularly encouraged by the broadcasters’ ongoing commitment to this audience," said Ms Wrightson.

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