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No 'justice' in the 'justice system' - Sensible Sentencing Trust

Contributor:
Fuseworks Media
Fuseworks Media

Laws exist to provide justice and protection for the community. When a meth-fuelled driver sped through a stop sign killing a man is sentenced to just nine months home detention, it shows how far from the provision of justice our system has come, says Darroch Ball co-leader of Sensible Sentencing Trust.

"Tai Massey-Hunter pleaded guilty for 'driving under the influence causing death’ carrying a maximum of ten years in prison. It is astounding that he can walk free from the court room and only highlights the lack of importance placed on accountability for the loss of a life shown by the court."

"The public in the court audibly gasped and looked shocked when the sentence was read out, which shows just how out of touch the courts have become with the sense of justice members of the public expect from the system."

"Sentences like this show how offender-centric our justice system has become. The judge reduced Massey-Hunter’s starting prison sentence of four and half years, to just nine months home detention due to an "early guilty plea and remorse", says Mr Ball.

"A family man, father, grandfather, and husband, was killed by an individual who was drugged and drove a warrantless car deliberately and dangerously with total disregard for the safety of others."

"What the judge has done is shown the court’s total disregard for the victim and the family whose lives have been irreparably devastated."

"The only way this trend to put offenders first will ever stop, is to ensure it is legislated that victims, justice, and the community be priority influence for judges when sentences are handed down, says Mr Ball.

"Until then, we will continue to see no justice in our justice system."

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