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World Vision Tertiary Research Award: Students Encouraged To Think Beyond Fundraising To Create Change

Contributor:
Fuseworks Media
Fuseworks Media

Wellington. World Vision will announce its inaugural Tertiary Research Award winner, Otago University student, Susan Smirk, at the Pacific Trafficking in Person Forum on Thursday (4th September).

In April, World Vision New Zealand launched the research award in six universities, encouraging students to think beyond fundraising and provide innovative solutions to age-old problems, such as child labour and trafficking.

Students were asked to write a comprehensive discussion piece on the innovative role that the New Zealand Government and civil society could play to lessen the occurrence of child labour in the developing world.

World Vision New Zealand's Advocacy Manager, Emma Sutcliffe, said that Susan presented a coherent argument for a New Zealand response.

"Susan focused clearly on the role that the New Zealand Government and civil society could play, using Fairtrade certification as a core theme and highlighting the role of consumer demand in perpetuating the use of child labour," said Emma.

At a time when consumers are starting to create change through purchasing choices, the announcement is timely. Just last week, Cadbury New Zealand announced a move to Fairtrade certification that will deliver real change for tens of thousands of Ghanaian cocoa farmers and their families.

The essays were judged by a panel of industry experts, including Don Clarke from NZAID; David Culverhouse from Council for International Development; and Emma Sutcliffe and Stephen Court from World Vision New Zealand.

The award is set to run again in 2010, focusing on economic development in the Pacific. Interested students should contact World Vision.

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