Fuseworks Media

‘Govt must move to ban greyhound racing following two deaths in Christchurch’

The consequences of the previous Government’s delay on banning greyhound racing has resulted in countless injuries and deaths – with two dogs killed in Christchurch already this year.

Miss Madrid, aged four, was euthanised at Addington Raceway on 26 January 2024 after she suffered two broken legs while racing. Like Wise was euthanised on 9 February 2024 after suffering an open fracture, also at Addington Raceway. She was only two years old.

SAFE Head of Investigation Will Appelbe says with a new Government in place, there is now an opportunity to correct the previous administrations failures.

“The previous Government should have moved to ban greyhound racing sooner. This process has dragged on for too long,” says Appelbe.

“It’s deeply frustrating that greyhounds continue to experience such extreme suffering considering how long we have been highlighting this,”

“There have been three reviews in the last decade into greyhound racing, which all made recommendations for change. We expected a final decision on the future of greyhound racing last year, but it was kicked out until after the election.”

Since 1 August 2023, the start of this racing season, there have been 551 injuries, 65 fractures and 6 deaths.

In 2021, then Racing Minister Grant Robertson put the greyhound racing industry on notice, saying they must make improvements or risk closure.

During the final 1News Leaders’ debate, Christopher Luxon assured New Zealanders that he would ban greyhound racing if elected.

“With the issue now at the forefront again, the new Prime Minister has the opportunity to translate words into action, and demonstrate true leadership where the previous Government couldn’t.”

“This must be a priority for Prime Minister Christopher Luxon and his new Government. A ban on greyhound racing is the only way to protect these dogs.

 

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